Skip to main content

About PBGC

PBGC Blog: Retirement Matters

A commonly asked question is how does PBGC determine how much a retiree receives? There's no simple explanation. The short answer is it's sort of complicated.  The longer, more detailed answer is that the amount a retiree receives is dependent on a multitude of factors specified by law, one of which is the maximum guarantee limit, which is adjusted yearly.

Common Misconception: The guarantee limit is often misunderstood to be the maximum benefit PBGC can pay retirees. However, that is not the case.

In many cases retirees receive benefits from PBGC in excess of the maximum guarantee. Whether a retiree receives more than the guarantee depends on a number of factors, including:

1. What the retiree's earned benefit was before the plan terminated

2. How long they've been retired when PBGC takes over

3. The plan's funded status at termination

4. Whether any other limitations apply

FACT: According to a 2006 study, about 85% of retirees who get their pension from PBGC receive their entire earned benefit.

FACT: The guarantee is lower for those who retire early or when there is a benefit for a survivor.

FACT: The guarantee is increased for those who retire after age 65.

Find out more about the 2013 maximum insurance benefit.

More Info on PBGC, Please…

  |   October 24, 2012

Often times, people don't know what the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) is, or what we do. Unfortunately, many find out about us when we have to assume responsibility for their pension plans either by way of company bankruptcy or the company's inability to pay retirement benefits.

A quick history lesson: On September 2, 1974, President Ford signed the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), creating a federal pension insurance program and an agency — the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation — to run it. The agency was created to encourage the continuation and maintenance of private-sector defined benefit pension plans, provide timely and uninterrupted payment of pension benefits, and keep pension insurance premiums at a minimum.

Now that you know how we got started, we'd like to tell you a little about how we operate.  

As our director Josh Gotbaum likes to put it, PBGC is similar to the FDIC, but instead of protecting depositors of insured banks, we protect pensions.  

FACT: We protect the retirement incomes of more than 44 million American workers in more than 27,500 private-sector defined benefit pension plans.

So, what's a defined benefit plan?

FACT: A defined benefit plan provides a specified monthly benefit at retirement, often based on a combination of salary and years of service.

FACT: We are not funded by general tax revenues.

So, how is the revenue generated? 

FACT: We collect insurance premiums from employers that sponsor insured pension plans, earn money from investments, and receive funds from pension plans we take over.

Visit our Web site to learn more about who we are and how we operate.

Logo of Pemco World Air Services Inc.

Were you collecting or planning to collect a pension from Pemco World Air Services Inc.? If so, we've got news for you.

As of Wednesday, October 3, 2012, PBGC became the trustee of the Pemco World Air Services Inc. Pension Plan, which has some 1,252 participants, including 380 retirees.

Headquartered in Tampa, Florida, Pemco primarily provided aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul services to commercial air carriers.

The company filed for bankruptcy on March 5, 2012 and the bankruptcy court approved the sale of their assets on August 9, 2012.

PBGC will pay all pension benefits earned by the company's retirees up to the legal limit of $56,000 a year for a 65-year-old.

Participants with questions about their pension benefits should contact PBGC Customer Service at 1-800-400-PBGC (7242).

PBGC will pay retirement benefits for over 500 current and future retirees of B'nai B'rith International, a Jewish advocacy organization based in Washington, DC. 

The agency stepped in because B'nai B'rith wouldn't have been able to pay its bills or stay in business unless the plan was terminated.

The B'nai B'rith pension plan ended as of April 30, 2011. PBGC will pay all pension benefits earned by the organization's retirees up to the legal limit of $54,000 a year for a 65-year-old. More...

 

One big job for PBGC is to make sure that companies with pension plans finance those plans and PBGC's safety net. The best outcome is always for a company to keep its own pension plans. But when it can't, we also fight in court to recover the money that the company owes for its pensions.

A recent case involved the Daytona Beach, Fla. News-Journal, a newspaper in receivership  meaning that a court ordered the sale of the paper. The business owed PBGC $15 million for pension benefits that the newspaper owed its employees but that PBGC is now paying.

But in court, another creditor made a claim for an amount greater than the value of the entire business, based on its former ownership of the company. A Florida court gave that claim priority  leaving PBGC and others out in the cold.

A PBGC staff attorney researched Florida law and found that the court had made an error. With that information PBGC successfully appealed the ruling. Florida law says that claims arising from debt get priority over claims arising from ownership. The appeal kept PBGC's claim alive and may yet enable PBGC to collect significant funds from the newspaper.

"The decision supports the general rule that debt comes before equity," said Chief Counsel Izzy Goldowitz, "so it's an important precedent."

Read the appeals court's full decision. [PDF]

 

On Wednesday the agency moved to end the Cinram Music Union Pension plan, which has some 280 participants and is about 53 percent funded, according to PBGC estimates.

We took this step because the company that sponsors the plan is about to sell the majority of its assets to a buyer that isn't assuming the pension plan.

The plan's sponsor, Cinram (U.S.) Holding's Inc., is involved in a Chapter 15 case in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del., while its Toronto-based parent, Cinram International Inc., sought creditor protection under the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act in a Canadian court. More...