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PBGC Blog: Retirement Matters

Monthly CalendarWho's participating in National Save for Retirement Week? We are!

Now, you may be asking yourself, "What exactly is this week, and is this the only time I'm supposed to save for retirement?"

To answer your second question...Of course not!

Here's the answer to your first question:

National Save for Retirement Week was created to raise public awareness about the importance of saving for retirement. National Save for Retirement Week is held every year during the third week of October. The week provides an opportunity for employees to reflect on their personal retirement goals and determine if they are on target to reach them.

This effort started in 2006, when Senators Gordon Smith (R-OR) and Kent Conrad (D-ND) introduced the first resolution establishing the week-long focus on retirement. Their goals were to elevate public knowledge about retirement savings and to encourage employees to save and participate in their employer-sponsored retirement plans.

Today, plan sponsors and plan participants around the U.S. take part in this important seven-day event. We invite you to participate with us by staying tuned for a blog post a day, right here on Retirement Matters

Photo: Academy President-Elect Tom Terry, PBGc CEO Josh Gotbaum, Academy President Cecil Bykerk

Academy President-Elect Tom Terry, PBGC Director Josh Gotbaum, Academy President Cecil Bykerk
Source: American Academy of Actuaries

PBGC Director Josh Gotbaum addressed the American Academy of Actuaries board last week. He applauded the academy's discussion paper, "Risky Business: Living Longer Without Income for Life," and encouraged the group to continue its lifetime income initiative. Gotbaum also discussed PBGC's efforts promoting sound retirement systems, and provided several ideas for how Congress, the public, and employers could each do their part to make sufficient lifetime income a reality.

In August, an analysis by the academy supported the methods used by PBGC to calculate the agency's financial position. "The Pension Committee of the American Academy of Actuaries believes the methods and assumptions used by the PBGC produce a reasonable representation of the PBGC's current obligation and deficit," the group said.

Editor's note: Portions of this blog post were reprinted from This Week with permission from the American Academy of Actuaries.

Collage of images - a photo of the Euro currency symbol, a photo of Australia on a globe, and the Canadian flag

While the U.S. faces a retirement crisis, other countries have implemented programs that provide a better level of economic security in retirement. As compared to the U.S., Australia, Canada, and the Netherlands provide higher retirement income for citizens through social security and universal/quasi-universal employer retirement plans.

These findings are in a new research brief, Lessons for Private Sector Retirement Security from Australia, Canada, and the Netherlands authored by John A. Turner, PhD, Pension Policy Center director, and Nari Rhee, PhD, National Institute of Retirement Security manager of research.

"Americans are struggling to save for retirement," says Rhee. "The typical family has only a few thousand dollars saved. Yet, other advanced countries are doing a far better job of enabling older populations to have economic security in retirement. We hope our research provides insight and ideas for U.S. policymakers working to improve Americans' economic insecurity." Download the full research brief.

The National Institute on Retirement Security originated the content of this post.

  1. Road sign with the words Retirement Ahead.Americans are deeply worried about retirement. Some 85 percent report that they are highly anxious about their retirement prospects. Read The Washington Post article, "Americans anxious about Retirement."
  2. Pensions are highly cost efficient. They can provide a given retirement benefit at about HALF the cost of an individual 401(k) account because pensions pool longevity risk and achieve better returns by investing for the long term. Read the report, "A Better Bang for the Buck: The Economic Efficiencies of Pensions."
  3. Pension benefits provide critical economic stability and accounted for a $1 trillion in economic output. In 2009, pensions supported some 6.5 million jobs. Read the report, "Pensionomics 2012: Measuring the Economic Impact of DB Pension Expenditures."
  4. Pensions reduce the risk of elder poverty and reduce public assistance costs. In 2010, older American households with pension income were nine times less likely to fall into poverty than those who had no pension income. Read the report, "The Pension Factor 2012: The Role of Pensions in Reducing Elder Economic Hardships."
  5. Americans overwhelmingly support Congressional action to provide all Americans with access to a new type of privately run pension plan. More than 90 percent would favor a new pension plan that is available to all Americans that is portable, and provides a monthly check in retirement. Read the report, "Pensions & Retirement Security 2013: A Roadmap for Policy Makers."

The National Institute on Retirement Security originated the content of this post.

Since the end of the recession more people are working for employers that offer retirement plans, and plan participation is up, according to a new report from the nonprofit Employee Benefit Research Institute — but most workers still have no retirement plan.

The data in the report is from the U.S. Census Bureau's latest Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) on retirement plan participation, covering December 2011 to March 2012.

Some key takeaways are:

  • 61 percent of all workers over age 16 had an employer that sponsored a pension or retirement plan for employees in 2012, up from 59 percent in 2009.
  • Workers participating in a plan increased to 46 percent in 2012, up slightly from 2009 (45 percent) but below 2003 (48 percent).
  • The vesting rate (the percentage of workers who say they were entitled to some pension benefit or lump-sum distribution if they left their job) stood at 43 percent in 2012, up from 24 percent in 1979.
  • This change is largely due to the increased number of workers participating in defined contribution retirement plans (such as 401(k) plans), where employee contributions are immediately vested, and faster vesting requirements in private-sector pension plans.
  • 401(k)-type plans were considered the primary plan by 78 percent of workers with a plan. Defined benefit (pension) plans were the primary plan for 21 percent of workers.

Take a look at notes from the Retirement Plan Participation: Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) Data, 2012

Kodak logo

Last week, there was a Kodak moment that all of the company's employees and retirees could be proud of.

On Tuesday, Eastman Kodak Co., known for its iconic film business, ended a 20 month bankruptcy proceeding with its two pension plans intact. That means the nearly 63,000 people covered by those plans will have a more secure retirement.

When companies seek bankruptcy protection it doesn't automatically mean that plans will be shut down and come to us. During Kodak's bankruptcy, we were on the unsecured creditors committee and we worked with them to ensure the plans would continue.

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