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PBGC Blog: Retirement Matters

Generic newspaperIn the recently published article "Thought Secure, Pooled Pensions Teeter and Fall," New York Times reporter Mary Williams Walsh gets candid commentary from PBGC Director Josh Gotbaum on the crisis facing the multiemployer pension system.

Gotbaum was quoted saying, "If Congress allows the PBGC to get the money and the authority it needs to do its job, then these plans can be preserved," he added. "If not, the PBGC will run out of money, too, and multiemployer pensioners will get virtually nothing. This is not something that can wait a few years. If people kick the can down the road, they'll find it went off a cliff."

Read the full article and find out more about multiemployer pension plans.

While we'd hope that you're using every day of every week to plan for your retirement, this week, April 7–11, 2014, has been designated as National Retirement Planning Week.

Organized by the National Retirement Planning Coalition — a group of prominent consumer advocacy and financial services organizations that are leading the charge to help Americans plan for retirement — this week represents a national effort to help consumers focus on their financial needs in retirement.

PBGC plays a role in this effort by protecting the retirement incomes of more than 40 million American workers in more than 26,000 private-sector defined benefit pension plans.

For informational resources, visit the National Retirement Planning Coalition's "Retire on Your Terms" webpage.

National Employee Benefits Day. April 2nd. http://www.ifebp.org

Created in 2004 by the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans (IFEBP), National Employee Benefits Day is nationally recognized on April 2.

According to the Employee Benefits Research Institute, almost nine in ten people don't think they'll have enough saved when they get to retirement. Study after study provides data pointing to the same conclusion: A crisis is coming. Are you prepared for it?

This year, the focus of National Employee Benefits Day is to increase awareness of the retirement crisis and to help plan sponsors motivate participants to actively engage in their financial wellness.

PBGC is always on the quest for finding new ways to make retirement security a hopeful reality for most Americans. Just yesterday, we announced a proposal that makes it easier for participants in 401(k) plans to get higher returns and get lifetime income — by moving their funds into traditional pensions.

To help make financial wellness more urgent for plan participants, the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans has created a number of resources that provide simple tools to get them thinking about their future.

Get started with IFEBP's helpful handouts that explain key terms for: Retirement Plans [PDF], Investments [PDF] and Credit [PDF].

Content in this blog entry was obtained from the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans website.

Ladies enjoying wine and each others company.

Every March we celebrate the profound impact women continue to have on American and world history. While Women's History Month is usually the designated time of year to robustly commemorate the contributions women have made to society, we also think it's a good time to take a look at the state of women's retirement security. After all, life after retirement is very important to "women's history."

First, let's be clear, the retirement picture is dismal for both men and women. But compared to men, women's retirement security is often less than adequate.

The United States Department of Labor reports married women tend to outlive their spouses by two years once they reach age 65 — that's two whole years of additional savings needed to cover the cost of living expenses that some do not factor in. Women also tend to take a more conservative approach when it comes to saving for retirement. Simply put, women do not invest in high-risk stocks because of the volatility of the stock market.

Another factor contributing to the bleak retirement outlook is women often delay saving for retirement. The Department of Labor also reports only 45 percent of the 62 million salaried women working in the United States contribute to a retirement plan.

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United We Stand at No. 19

  |   February 27, 2014

The United States maintained its retirement security ranking at 19th — the same from last year — among 150 nations analyzed by Natixis Global Retirement Index.

For overall retirement security, the U.S. remains behind the majority of countries in Western Europe and Canada, and ahead only of Israel on the list of the top 20 nations.

Natixis measures the quality of life for people in their retirement years based on 20 measures of health, wealth, quality of life, and material well-being that affect people's retirement security.

Read the full Natixis report: 2014 Global Retirement Index.

Col. Charles McGee

Col. Charles McGee delivers keynote address at PBGC'S Black History Month Celebration.

On Feb. 11, 2014, PBGC staff witnessed living black history as the agency's Chapter of Blacks in Government (BIG) and the Special Emphasis Program (SEP) hosted the annual Black History Month program. With the national theme in mind, Civil Rights in America, this year's program was widely deemed one of the greatest in PBGC history.

Col. Charles McGee, an original, and now retired, member of the Tuskegee Airmen delivered the keynote address to the agency's staff as they filled the building's training institute in celebration of Black History Month. McGee's career in the legendary all-black 332nd Fighter Group-12th Air Force began in 1944. He is among the first African-American military aviators in the United States Armed forces.

During WWII black pilots were trained at a segregated air base in Tuskegee, Ala., and became known as the Tuskegee Airmen. At the helm of P-39 fighters they flew hundreds of patrol and attack missions, and were also used to escort B-17 and B-24 bombers. The airmen were portrayed in the 2012 motion picture, "Red Tails," produced by "Star Wars" creator George Lucas. The Red Tails nickname came from the ruby-toned tails of the airmen's planes.

In his address, McGee recounted the struggles he and his fellow soldiers faced as African Americans in the Air Force. Throughout World War II, African Americans in a number of U.S. states were subject to Jim Crow laws and all branches of the military were racially segregated. But these obstacles didn't stop McGee and his peers from stepping up and fighting for freedom at home and abroad. He stressed the "Three Ps," which helped to shape his illustrious career as a Tuskegee Airman: persevere, prepare, and perform. "Excellence should always be your goal," McGee said.

On Jan. 31, 1973, McGee retired from the Air Force after 30 years of military service.

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