Skip to main content

About PBGC

PBGC Blog: Retirement Matters

Right now, the Powerball jackpot stands at $425 million, but whoever wins it will probably be broke within a few years. That's what happens to 70% of winners, according to the National Endowment for Financial Education.

That made us think about retirement. (We know, we know... what doesn't?)

Lottery winners can choose to take annual payments, pay lower taxes on their newfound windfalls, and have 30 years before worrying about running out of money. But research shows that the vast majority of winners choose to take a windfall lump sum instead.

But those who take the lump sum apparently don't "invest" it so wisely.

So if you're the lucky Powerball winner, unless you plan to keep your job, think twice about how to fund your retirement, and whether to take your winnings all at once. Remember, that gigantic pot of money has to last your whole life, not just a few years.

And even if you don't win the lottery, beware of a lump sum of whatever size. It may look good now, but you take on the risk that you'll outlive it. Most folks do better with guaranteed income.

Brown gavel sitting on a wood blockThings looked bleak last year for plan funding when a U.S. District Court in Massachusetts said private equity firms didn't operate as trades or businesses, but passive investors in the companies they own. If the ruling was left intact, it would have created a major loophole in this kind of liability for private equity funds connected to pension plans.

At the time, the court considered whether two funds managed by private equity firm Sun Capital were responsible for $4.5 million in withdrawal liability after their company, Scott Brass, a Rhode Island-based metal fabricator, left the New England Teamsters multiemployer plan.

Such distinctions are important because entities engaged in a trade or businesses may be responsible for pension shortfalls in single employer plans and for withdrawal liability in multiemployer plans.

Earlier this year, the Teamsters asked the First Circuit Court of Appeals to revisit the issue and PBGC filed a friend of the court brief supporting their cause.

More...

With recent news of the Detroit bankruptcy, more people are asking about PBGC's role in public pensions. However, by law, PBGC doesn't insure state, county, or city plans.

While we insure most private-sector (non-governmental) pension plans, Congress has also defined exceptions that PBGC does not insure. But for more information about public pensions, please contact the National Conference on Public Employee Retirement Systems

Informational graphic with silhouette of call center representative on the right. The graph describes the responsibilities of the 70 team members mentioned in the article and the call volume received over the past two years, also mentioned in the article.

When retirees and workers wish to contact PBGC, they first turn to the Customer Contact Center, which does its best to answer every call.

The center is nestled in Kingstowne, Va., outside of the hustle and bustle of Washington. Its representatives are the agency's first responders, making sure no call goes unanswered.

The team of 70 comprised of two federal managers, 13 contact center leadership team members, and 55 customer service representatives, regularly communicate with the Corporation's Field Benefit Administrators (FBA), transferring participants' calls to the FBAs to ensure questions on benefit entitlement are answered. The center also transfers calls to the Corporation's lawyers when participants have inquiries regarding legal matters.

The number of calls received fluctuates each month. From 2010 to 2012, the center received an average of 521,000 calls yearly or about 2,000 every business day.

More...

Like the old saying goes "if you don't use it, you lose it." A study of nearly half a million people in France revealed that people who delay retirement have less risk of developing Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia.

Read the full Associated Press article on the USAToday website

The Wall Street Journal CFO Network Annual Meeting 2013 wrapped up last month. PBGC Director Josh Gotbaum participated in an interview session titled "The Great American Pension Crisis: Funding Past Promises and Future Retirement."

In his interview with Gabriella Stern, Deputy Managing Editor, WSJ Digital Network, Director Gotbaum focused on how U.S. companies will tackle mounting pension obligations in the coming years.

Dallas Salisbury, President and CEO, Employee Benefit Research Institute, also offered perspectives.

Take a look at the Dow Jones video recording of the interview. NOTE: The video may take a minute or two to fully load.